• leonardodicaprio

    @leonardodicaprio

    1 month ago
  • #Regram #RG @natgeo: Photograph by @enricsala The high seas - marine waters beyond any country’s jurisdiction - cover 64 percent of the ocean’s surface, and are dominated by a handful of fishing countries that reap the biggest benefits of fishing in these global commons. The main types of fishing in the high seas target tuna (like the yellowfin in the photo), sharks, squid, krill, and deep bottom-dwelling fish. But do these countries really benefit from that distant fishing? And who does? A new @natgeopristineseas study reveals that, without large government subsidies, fishing in more than half of the current high seas fishing grounds would be unprofitable. In fact, on aggregate, subsidies to high seas fishing (more than $4 billion per year) are more than twice larger than the profits. These results support the idea of eliminating subsidies that perpetuate overfishing and destruction of the marine environment. For a bolder proposal for conservation of the high seas, watch Enric Sala's TED talk (link at @enricsala profile) @natgeo @globalfishingwatch #highseas
    Leonardo DiCaprio #Regram #RG @natgeo: Photograph by @enricsala
The high seas - marine waters beyond any country’s jurisdiction - cover 64 percent of the ocean’s surface, and are dominated by a handful of fishing countries that reap the biggest benefits of fishing in these global commons. The main types of fishing in the high seas target tuna (like the yellowfin in the photo), sharks, squid, krill, and deep bottom-dwelling fish. But do these countries really benefit from that distant fishing? And who does?  A new @natgeopristineseas study reveals that, without large government subsidies, fishing in more than half of the current high seas fishing grounds would be unprofitable. In fact, on aggregate, subsidies to high seas fishing (more than $4 billion per year) are more than twice larger than the profits. These results support the idea of eliminating subsidies that perpetuate overfishing and destruction of the marine environment. For a bolder proposal for conservation of the high seas, watch Enric Sala's TED talk (link at @enricsala profile)
@natgeo @globalfishingwatch #highseas

    #Regram #RG @natgeo: Photograph by @enricsala The high seas - marine waters beyond any country’s jurisdiction - cover 64 percent of the ocean’s surface, and are dominated by a handful of fishing countries that reap the biggest benefits of fishing in these global commons. The main types of fishing in the high seas target tuna (like the yellowfin in the photo), sharks, squid, krill, and deep bottom-dwelling fish. But do these countries really benefit from that distant fishing? And who does? A new @natgeopristineseas study reveals that, without large government subsidies, fishing in more than half of the current high seas fishing grounds would be unprofitable. In fact, on aggregate, subsidies to high seas fishing (more than $4 billion per year) are more than twice larger than the profits. These results support the idea of eliminating subsidies that perpetuate overfishing and destruction of the marine environment. For a bolder proposal for conservation of the high seas, watch Enric Sala's TED talk (link at @enricsala profile)
    @natgeo @globalfishingwatch #highseas

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allthatsinbetweenofficial - All That's Inbetween 6 days ago

Important message here Thank you for raising awareness..! There is sadly too much of this excessive and wasteful use of our oceans’ beautiful and vast variations of species. Nothing is really being done to stop it. Money talks only to money.. We need our oceans more than dollars... 🌊🌊🌊